Full Stack JavaScript: What is a Full Stack? And Why is it MEAN?

(Previous: Coding Dojo: Algorithm Platform)

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Is this a full stack? Does it come with Java? Sorry, I know, puns are the worst… Especially breakfast puns.

For aspiring web developers, it’s not enough to be a JavaScript or Ruby or Java ninja–you have to know how your JavaScript or Ruby or Java interacts with the whole project you are working on.

That’s why developers talk about Full Stack Development. In very general terms, a Full Stack, like a stack of pancakes has three parts: the front, back, and middle (more professionally referred to as the Front End, Back End, and Web Framework). Continue reading “Full Stack JavaScript: What is a Full Stack? And Why is it MEAN?”

jQuery and JavaScript: Treehouse

(Previous: jQuery and JavaScript: Codecademy)

treehouse

My next stop for jQuery and JavaScript tutorials was at Treehouse. Treehouse offers two jQuery tutorials: jQuery Basics, Using jQuery Plugins (and AJAX Basics, which ended up being a detailed explanation of how the jQuery “.ajax()” function works), as well as JavaScript Basics, JavaScript Loops, Objects, and Arrays, Interactive Web Pages with JavaScript, and Object-Oriented JavaScript.

Continue reading “jQuery and JavaScript: Treehouse”

jQuery and JavaScript: Codecademy

(Previous: Stuck in the Middle)

jquerylogo

I love the slogan for jQuery: “write less, do more”.

Having now slogged through quite a few jQuery tutorials, and interactive JavaScript tutorials (more on those later), I will say this: jQuery can be a huge timesaver, and is specifically designed to help front-end developers do the things they do the most, but faster. Continue reading “jQuery and JavaScript: Codecademy”

HTML/CSS Part 2: XAMPP

(Previous: HTML/CSS Part 1: Codecademy and W3schools)

xampp

Learning HTML/CSS from tutorials was a good start to get an idea of what types of things they can do, but I find I always learn more from practicing in less controlled conditions.

Enter XAMPP. With this tool, you can host your own HTML/CSS pages from your own computer, so you can see how they look. Can you hear my excitement?

Continue reading “HTML/CSS Part 2: XAMPP”